Tag: Instagram

Welcome to another Mansfield Thought Leadership post. Our posts our designed to help the C-Suite with Public Relations and Social Media Management.

Should your company’s C-Suite executives be using social media? Even if they should be, chances are they’re not—according to research published in 2016 from CEO.com and Domo, 60 per cent of Fortune 500 CEOs have no social media presence whatsoever.

Whether or not the company brass should be publicly active on social networks depends largely on who they are as a person and how they want to be perceived within the company and the industry. Do they want to appear more relatable and connect more genuinely with employees and colleagues? Conversely, executives may harm the brand if their social media is done poorly. Just look at United Airline’s Oscar Munoz’ response to the controversy around their forced removal of a passenger earlier this year.

To give you an idea of the pros and the cons, we broke down the simple reasons for and against your company’s leaders engaging on social media.

 

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Reasons for getting your company leaders on social:

• Shaping brand views: any executives on social media will serve as an extension of the company and their social media posts coming from the top will support the larger marketing activities. This can help the brand appear more accessible to a larger audience.

• Being approachable to employees: any efforts to be more accessible to outside audiences are applicable within the company itself. When employees are engaged on social media with their leaders they’re likely more satisfied in their job which will lead to less turnover.

• Improving relationships with customers and stakeholders: active execs help show the public and future customers how much the organization values customer experience. CEOs engaging with real people on social media can enhance brand opinions and loyalty.

• Talent recruitment: being adept on social emphasizes a CEO’s know-how with technology. Organizations searching for recruits who are invested in tech-friendly companies may value a CEO who keeps a strong social media presence.

• Keeping abreast of company or industry issues: social media allows CEOs to proactively monitor and participate in the relevant discussions that arise in regards to their company or industry. This can help company leadership react quickly to key industry developments.

On the other side, basic arguments against CEOs embracing social include:

• It may be too time consuming: sometimes time is a CEO’s most valuable commodity and forcing social media on them can take their attention away from more relevant pieces of business.

• It could be inauthentic: it’s not uncommon for executives to let their PR or communications teams run their accounts. While they’re most likely approving the posts, the words may not feel genuine which largely defeats the purpose of a personal social media account.

• The risk factor: if they are running their own accounts, giving a CEO free rein of their can be risky if they’re known for contentious or provocative commentary.

• It could harm internal productivity: if company leadership is seen as proactively social it may encourage employees to spend more time than necessary socializing online leading to decreased productivity.

However, if your company execs see the value in social media, launching them on it is a multi-step process. Approach it like any other social media campaign—establish goals and objectives, set benchmarks and most importantly, figure out the personality they want to project to the world.

Above all the brand humanizing, thought leadership and company updates from the top, their personal brands should shine through on whatever they put out.

If you need help navigating the Social Media landscape, we can work with you in confidence to improve your online presence.

Welcome to another entry in our Tips & Tricks series. In this post we will be cover tips to help with your digital services.

Every year during the weekend prior to Labour Day, Canada’s largest, and North America’s third largest, pop culture event takes over downtown Toronto. If you are unexpectedly caught in the horde, sometimes literal horde depending on the cosplay, you might think that Toronto has been taken over.

At its heart, FanExpo, which covers nearly every square foot of the north and south buildings of the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, combines comics, sci-fi, horror, anime and gaming (video and otherwise).

The event attracts more than 120,000 people. They come to shop for artisan jewelry, original pieces of art for all the genres, collectibles of every form. They come to meet the comic book artists that inspired them. Most of all they come for the celebrities. Autographs of Hollywood celebrity or the sci-fi elites are extremely popular. Between $40 and $100 means about a minute of time while talent pen their names. Want a photo? That will be another $100, more for group shoots. The thousands of dollars an hour celebrities earn is nothing compared to the earned media that brands generate.

This year, Cards Against Humanity who are famous for their Black Friday “deals” had people lined up and taking photos of their booth titled “Apologies from Americans” while other attendees snapped shots of those in the line-up. The upcoming film Thor: Ragnarok featured actor costumes in front of a movie poster wall, which drew the attention of fans who captured the image and shared it. The upcoming TV show of Star Trek: Discovery gave fans the chance to play “phaser Tag” while other shared photos of a wall well-branded with the show’s logo.

Competing for each and every dollar are the independent artists as they hustle to position themselves as the next hot property, but these new talents lack the big budgets of the established players.

Here are four tips for low-budget hustle tactics used by the independents.

1. Know your audience, and know what they like. Artists recognized how popular the video game Overwatch is and recognized how loyal their fans are. When the lone voice actor, Charlet Chung from the game with 30 million players came to sign autographs, artists created prints for her to sign. A majority of artists promoting their own original art also featured many renditions of the popular Overwatch character D.Va. The booths that had prints had line ups of fans eager to buy which drew in potential fans for their original material.

2. Be everywhere. Most brands social media extends to Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Independents need to be everywhere and their business cards prove it. The majority had at least five to to 10 social network icons highlighted: Google+, YouTube, Twitch, Tumblr, Behance, Pinterest, Dribble, DeviantArt and Patreon on top of the Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

3. Employ a three step approach to acquisition: interest, entice, engage. The real hustle of the art occurs when artists start selling themselves. They have a few square feet to claim as their own, and they lay it all bare to the world, that is step one, gain interest. Once they have a moment of attention they entice. They know they are surrounded by passionate fans, they quickly identify their realm of fandom and sell directly to it and they do it hundreds of times per hour. Thirdly they engage with the soft sell, offering package deals or simply handing out their business card. These artists sell on all platforms and realize that physical sales are not the only source of income.

4. Be the source. Artists don’t only sell art, they sell knowledge and experience. Patreon has made it easier for artists to receive a monthly income from people that appreciate their art as well as share how they make it. YouTube and Twitch partners share revenue with the content creators that populate their networks.

Keep these tips in mind if you’re an artist or even an established brand. If you would like any help with your digital presence, ask us how we can help you.

When it comes to creating images to represent your brand, you want to make sure they are aesthetically pleasing. These images can be used on various platforms, such as YouTube, blog posts, Instagram, Facebook, website pages, videos and even logos. To create images that please the eye there are some basic principles of art that are easy to understand and fundamental to create an attractive image; these include colour, composition and text.

First, use colours that complement each other: the colour wheel.

colourwheel

The simplest way to do this is to use colours at the opposite ends of the wheel (as shown above). These are called complementary colours. For example, yellow is complementary to purple, as green is complementary to red. Another option is to use three colours that are an equal distance from each other, such as red, green and blue, or orange, purple and turquoise.

In the image below, you can see where complementary colours are used. The green and red trees complement each other, the same way that blue complements the orange.

Other tactics you can use are to use all different shades of the same colour such as light blue to dark blue (called analogous) or create a black and white image with a strong accent colour.

colour

Second, use strategic composition: the rule of thirds.

ruleofthirds

Have you ever seen the grid on Instagram before you upload an image? This is a common practice used by artists and it is called the rule of thirds. It is a grid placed over the image that is made of three horizontal and three vertical lines. The theory behind it is that the subjects of your image should be in a box or on the line. Using this principle makes the image more pleasing to the brain and makes it appear balanced. Notice how in the image they are also using complementary colours- blue and orange.

Third, do not use more than two fonts and make the size legible.

guinness

Using one to two fonts will make your text easy to read. Too many fonts will be distracting to your audience.

Keep in mind the destination of the image. If it is a picture going on Instagram where people will be seeing it on a smaller screen, the font should be larger. However, if this is for a poster, the text can be smaller relative to the image. For example, Guinness used smaller font in this image as it was going to be printed large for distribution. They also included only two types of font on their image, incorporated the rule of thirds and complementary colours (although muted, the yellow Guinness symbol complements the purple undertones of the image)

Finally, listen to your gut.

These principles are great tools to creating a pleasing image, but ultimately it must look right to you. Do not be scared to try new things.

Happy designing!

Find out more about how we can help with your social media accounts here.

Instagram is growing at a rapid rate. According to Time, in the past four months Instagram reached 700 million active users, which is the photo and video sharing app’s quickest growth spurt to date. Nowadays, it’s rare that a business doesn’t include Instagram in their social media marketing strategy. And there’s a good reason for it. Instagram is one of the best ways to visually promote your business and engage your audience.

A successful account isn’t measured by just the amount of Instagram followers, but rather is measured by the engagement rate. In the age of buying followers and likes, it is still possible to grow your account’s following and engagement rate organically. The best recipe for a high engagement rate is consistently posting aesthetically-pleasing, relevant and creative photos and videos. However, there are certain tricks you should implement into your Instagram strategy that will help you to organically improve your Instagram’s engagement rate.

Follow these four rules to see organic and substantial growth on your Instagram account:

 1. Have a full content strategy:

With 700 million active Instagram users, you’ll need to be unique to stand out, and behind every great Instagram is an even better content strategy. Merely posting photos on Instagram does not mean you have a content strategy. The most successful brands have a method to their madness and it’s no secret as to why their social media accounts are so popular. A good Instagram strategy will take planning, research and some experimental posts before you find out what works for your account and audience.

Ask yourself these questions when working on your content strategy:

  • Is there a theme? Consider the culture of your business and what you’re trying to convey through your account. Keep posts consistent, whether that means similar captions, filters or subject matter, make sure you stick to your theme. Remember: the best Instagram accounts have an obvious style.
  • How often and what time should I post? Several studies have been conducted on what times are the best for optimal Instagram engagement, however, the best posting times are dependant on several factors, mainly your audience. A good place to start is by using Instagram’s follower insights. After registering your account as a business profile, Instagram will automatically generate insights that will show you when your followers are most active. To see a high engagement rate start by posting your photos during your followers’ most active periods. As for how often, the general rule is at least once a day.

 2. Use quality hashtags

Hashtags are used on every social media platform, but they seem most effective on Instagram. Use the proper hashtags to reach a larger targeted audience than just those already following you. Instagram allows users to post 30 hashtags per post, and a TrackMaven study found that posts with more than 11 hashtags have the highest engagement rates.

What hashtags should I use? The four types of hashtags to include on every post are Instagram’s popular hashtags, local hashtags, related hashtags and branded hashtags. The actual hashtags will differ depending on your content, but there are a few tools, like Hashtagify, that will quickly discover the best ones for your content.

3.  Be extra social

It’s not enough to just consistently post quality content on your account. What separates the great accounts from the good accounts is the level of socializing you participate in with your followers. This ranges from just “liking” a follower’s comment on your post to sharing user-generated content. Other than liking and commenting on other accounts’ posts, which you should do often, try out these socializing tips to gain traction:

  • Ask questions in your captions and ask followers to tag their friends in the comments
  • Share user-generated content and tag the follower in the caption
  • Like up to 100 photos on your explore page per day
  • Respond to comments as quickly as possible
  • Tag influencers or relevant brands in your photos

4. Only post quality, creative photos

Visuals are everything on Instagram so make sure to only post high-quality, crisp images. There’s no need to invest in a professional camera to ensure maximum quality images, as any smartphone camera can do the job. Steer clear of mainly product photos and instead give your audience a look into the culture of your business. Introduce your employees and office, share cool shots of the cities you work in and give some behind-the-scenes looks.

Candid photos will give your audience an inside look at the personality of your brand. Quality over quantity, so make sure to avoid blurry, low-resolution and over-filtered photos and instead share well-lit, tastefully edited and clear focused images.

Learn more about how Mansfield can help improve your Instagram here.

Personal branding is something that everyone does, whether they realize it or not.

Building a personal brand means optimizing and managing the way that your identity is received online. In this blog post specifically, we will give 12 tips on how to clean up and improve your personal branding using social media. Social media is probably the biggest key to building your brand, since it can be so personalized. more

What the most popular brands are doing right, and how you can too.

Branding today isn’t just about having a nice logo, a digital marketing strategy and a variety of social media handles. We’re now in the age of millennials who want meaningful connections, innovative yet community focused brands, relevant and useful information and top-of-the-line product. Simply covering the bases of traditional marketing won’t cut it anymore. Thankfully, a lot of brands out there are creating content and strategies that we can look to and learn from. Here are some top brands who are going beyond the traditional landscape to gain new customers each day. more

7 Tips for Branding on Social Platforms.

Building a company brand  is a marketing strategy that is used to differentiate one business from another. This includes recognizable designs, symbols or icons that make your company stand out in a crowd. Social media can help you build your brand in ways you can’t with traditional advertising.

Social media is becoming so vital to company brand growth, that 71 percent of brands plan to invest more heavily in social media in the coming year to get followers and build brand reputation.

Here are some simple tips to get you thinking about your company’s brand and how you can improve your social relevance. more

Timing is Everything.

When marketers develop their social media strategies, their focus is typically on a tier-one, revenue-driving campaign. To drive sales however, an emphasis must be placed on the overall brand narrative, as users seek out authentic and timely interactions.

As Gary Vaynerchuck might say, ‘right hooks’ convert traffic to sales, but your social media ROI is dependent on the quality and context of your content1. Timing is everything.

Google believes so as well. According to ThinkWithGoogle’s recent report on Micro-Moments: more

A Review of Canada’s Digital Future in Focus.

Last week, comScore released their 2015 Canada Digital Future in Focus. The annual report covers usage patterns from the previous year, as well as the future of digital in Canada.

Here are a few highlights that caught my attention. more